Tuesday, May 28, 2013

1908 Public Library, Berlin, Wisconsin




[LIB9262] Postmarked Fond Du Lac October 16, 1908 and addressed to Mrs. A. H. Ernst, Cristobal, C.Z. Panama. 


Columbia University Library, New York City


[LIB9261] This monumental edifice, combining the Roman Classic Style with Greek Refinements was erected in 1897 at a cost of $13,000,000, a gift of President Low. It is the focal point of the general campus layout, occupying a commanding position on Morningside Heights, and has an estimated capacity of 1,500,000 volumes. [from the back of the card]

1945 Roswell P. Flower Memorial Library, Watertown, New York



[LIB9260] Genuine Curteich-Chicago. 4A-H1697.

1947 Public Library, St. Louis, Missouri



[LIB9259] The Public Library, a fine specimen of dignified public-building architecture, occupies a commanding position overlooking the new Civic Center in the heart of the St. Louis business district. [from the back of the card]

Public Library, Kansas City, Missouri


[LIB9258] Published by The Southwest News Company, Kansas City, Missouri. Card No. M 931.

Thursday, May 23, 2013

Kern County Free Library, Bakersfield, California


[LIB9257] - This beautiful modern building houses the Central Library of the county system which circulates between 1,500,000 and 2,000,000 books a year. It was completed in 1957.

The Beale Memorial Library houses extensive materials in fine arts, historic Kern County and California Maps and Photographs, Genealogy, and Geology, Mining, Petroleum (GMP), and Local History.

Library, Racine, Wisconsin


[LIB9256] Seventh Street and Lake Avenue. Dedicated May 19, 1958.

1950 Carnegie Library, Guthrie, Oklahoma


[LIB9255] Guthrie's Historic Carnegie Library was constructed in 1902. It was the second Carnegie Library built in Oklahoma, and is the oldest existing Carnegie Library in the state. Placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1971, the Carnegie Library now exists as a part of the Guthrie Museum Complex.

1908 Public Library, Canton, Ohio


[LIB9254]

Public Library, Erie, Pennsylvania


[LIB9253] Website

Wednesday, May 15, 2013

1912 Library, Evanston, Illinois



[LIB9174] Apparently the sender was having a better time than ever and "I have plenty of money."

You've got to love this one: “Book mutilation in Evanston. The authorities of the Evanston Public Library are looking for a man who has a mania for destroying valuable books. Within a week several volumes have been mutilated by a red hot instrument run through the pages. From the atlases maps have disappeared. Serialized works have also suffered. The Council passed a new ordinance making the punishment more severe.” --Times Herald [Website]

1949 Matson Public Library, Princeton, Illinois


[LIB9173] In the summer of 1912, the Chicago architectural firm of Patton & Miller was contracted to being work on the permanent library facility in the main square of Princeton. A year later, the new facility was opened to the public. [website]

Public Library, Lockport, New York


[LIB9172] Building still in use as a public library.

The inadequate quarters of the library were strained during the depression years and the circulation reached 163,000 in 1934. The long-felt need for a separate building became more acute every year. Two bequests gave impetus to the Trustees’ desire to plan an adequate building. The will of Mrs. Elvira Wheeler provided a sum for construction and furnishings and Mrs. Ann M. Sawyer bequeathed the present site on East Avenue. The Trustees then arranged to qualify for aid under the Federal Emergency Administration of Public Works, leaving a balance of only $18,000 to be raised by the city. The raising of these funds was the subject of much dispute and threatened legal action by the library trustees. The building was valued at $140,000 at the time of its dedication in June 1936. [website]

Tuesday, May 7, 2013

The Folger Shakespeare Library, Washington, D.C.


[LIB9021] Come, take choice of all my library, and so beguile thy sorrow. - William Shakespeare

1944 Public Library, Rockville, Indiana


[LIB9020] Building still in use a public library.

Under the direction of Miss Kirkpatrick, the arduous task of raising the necessary funds for purchasing a suitable lot was undertaken, and in March, 1914, the property known as the Andrew Boardman livery barn was purchased for $2,500 (Historical).  Carnegie Library building specifications were met by R.L. Brookie, Indianapolis architect, and James T. Boswell, Bloomingdale contractor, and the building completed at a cost of $12,500 with William E. Ferguson, chairman of building committee and George W. Rohm, superintendent of construction (Historical).  The building was opened and dedicated January 15 and 16 1916.  Miss Mary Linebarger was selected librarian and served until March 1919.  She was succeeded by Miss Mary Lambert who served until August 1927 (History). [website]

1945 Library, St. Francis Health Resort, Denville, New Jersey





[LIB9019]

Public Library and Memorial Hall, Lowell, Massachusetts



[LIB9018] In 1889, the Lowell City Council passed a resolution providing for the erection of a new City Hall. Shortly thereafter, as a result of a petition by Lowell citizens, the Council authorized a second building to be located adjacent to this new City Hall, to be dedicated to the memory of the Lowell men who had lost their lives in the Civil War. This building would also be the site of the new library. The city hired Lowell-born architect Frederick W. Stickney to design Memorial Hall. During the ceremony to lay the cornerstone, Edward T. Russell, Commander of the B.F. Butler Post of the G.A.R., said the new building would be "a monument to the heroism of the past and a storehouse of knowledge for the future." Memorial Hall opened in 1893 with the City Library in its basement. [website]

Thursday, May 2, 2013

Public Library, Chicago, Illinois


[LIB9017] The Public Library, located on Michigan Avenue and Washington Street, is one of the large libraries in the United States. Contains a circulating library of 382,280 volumes; nearly two million books per year are drawn for home use. [From the back of the card]

Public Library, New Haven, Connecticut


[LIB9016]  “Gentlemen:–If the City of New Haven will provide a suitable site for it, I desire to erect and present to the City a handsome, fireproof building for the Public Library.” With these words, and a gift of $300,000, Mary E. Ives (Mrs. Hoadley Ives), became the founding mother of the present New Haven Free Public Library. The site, at the corner of Elm and Temple Streets where the Library stands today, was purchased by the city for $95,000. The architect, Cass Gilbert, designed the brick and marble building to harmonize with the traditional architecture of New Haven, and especially with the United Church nearby. The building was formally dedicated to the City of New Haven on May 27, 1911.[Website]


Main Library, Cass Avenue Facade, Detroit, Michigan


[LIB9015] - The Detroit Public Library with its 28 branch libraries and more than 3 million books, maps and manuscripts is one of the great public libraries of the world. Its Main Library, in the Cultural Center, with fronts on Woodward Avenue and Cass Avenue, is a show-placed of Detroit. [From the back of the card]

1909 John Carter Brown Library, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island


[LIB9014] - The original Library building was formally dedicated in 1904. In 1990, the Library raised the capital to construct a 15,000 square foot addition, designed in the classical style like the original structure and named the Caspersen Building. [Website]


New Library Building, University of Maine, Orono, Maine


[LIB9013] - The University of Maine's library building was one of 108 U.S. academic libraries built with funding from Andrew Carnegie and the Carnegie Corporation. As was the case with public libraries, by 1910 Carnegie had funded the construction of over one half of the total number of the college libraries ever built in the U.S. Carnegie Hall on the University of Maine campus is one of Maine's five academic and 18 public "Carnegie libraries." [Website]

1914 Hubbard Hall, the Library of Bowdoin College, Brunswick, Maine


[LIB9012] - The College took sixty years to outgrow a library designed to serve the needs of an indefinite future. When the Hawthorne-Longfellow Library was completed in 1965, the former main library room of Hubbard Hall, to the left of the large lower hall, was turned into the Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum. Thomas Hubbard would have been pleased, for he was president of the Peary Arctic Club from 1908 until his death in 1915. [Website]